The Jesuit New World Order

Wednesday, 4 April 2012












  
 MESSIANIC PROPHECY "He came unto his own, and his own received him not." John 1:11




Subject Prophecy Fulfillment
At the time of Messiah's coming, Israel would have unfit leaders. Zechariah 11:4-6a Matthew 23:1-4
The Messiah's brothers would disbelieve him. Psalm 69:8b John 7:3-5
The Messiah would be the "stone" rejected by the Jews. Psalm 118:22 Matthew 21:42-43
The Jews would have a hardened heart against the Messiah. Isaiah 6:9-10a John 12:37-40
The Messiah would be a "stumbling stone" for the Jews. Isaiah 8:14 Matthew 21:43-44
The unbelief of Israel's leaders would force the Messiah to reject them. Zechariah 11:8a Matthew 23:33
The Messiah would stop ministering to the those who rejected Him. Zechariah 11:9 Matthew 13:10-11
The Messiah would be distressed over the Jews unbelief. Isaiah 49:4a Luke 19:41-42
The Messiah's own people would not believe he was the Christ. Isaiah 53:1 John 12:37-38
The Messiah would be rejected. Zechariah 11:12-13b Matthew 26:14-15
The Messiah would be rejected. Isaiah 53:3b Matthew 27:21-23
The Messiah would be rejected by the Jews. Isaiah 49:4b John 5:43
The Messiah would be rejected by the Jews. Psalm 69:8a John 1:11
The Messiah would be rejected in favor of another king. Zechariah 11:4-6c John 19:13-15
The Messiah would be rejected. Zechariah 11:12-13b Matthew 26:14-15
The Messiah would be rejected by Gentiles. Psalm 2:1 Acts 4:25-28
The Messiah would be rejected. Zechariah 12:10c John 1:11
The Messiah's rejection would cause God to remove His protection of Israel. Zechariah 11:4-6b Luke 19:41-44
The Messiah's rejection would cause God to remove His protection of Israel. Zechariah 11:10-11a Luke 19:41-44
Israel would be scattered as a result of rejecting the Messiah Zechariah 13:7d Matthew 26:31-56




At the time of Messiah's coming, Israel would have unfit leaders.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Zechariah 11:4-6a
"
4 Thus saith the Lord my God; Feed the flock of the slaughter; 5 Whose possessors slay them, and hold themselves not guilty: and they that sell them say, Blessed be the Lord; for I am rich: and their own shepherds pity them not. 6 For I will no more pity the inhabitants of the land, saith the Lord: but, lo, I will deliver the men every one into his neighbours hand, and into the hand of his king: and they shall smite the land, and out of their hand I will not deliver them."
Matthew 23:1-4
"
1 THEN spake Jesus to the multitude, and to his disciples, 2 Saying, The scribes and the Pharisees sit in Moses seat: 3 All therefore whatsoever they bid you observe, that observe and do; but do not ye after their works: for they say, and do not. 4 For they bind heavy burdens and grievous to be borne, and lay them on mens shoulders; but they themselves will not move them with one of their fingers." Matthew 23:13-14
"
13 But woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites for ye shut up the kingdom of heaven against men: for ye neither go in yourselves, neither suffer ye them that are entering to go in. 14 Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites for ye devour widows houses, and for a pretence make long prayer: therefore ye shall receive the greater damnation."
Matthew 23:23-24
"
23 Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites for ye pay tithe of mint and anise and cummin, and have omitted the weightier matters of the law, judgment, mercy, and faith 24 Ye blind guides, which strain at a gnat, and swallow a camel."
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
Matthew 3:7,  5:20,  12:22-45,  13:10-15,  15:1-9,  16:6,  16:21,  23:1-39,  Mark 7:5-13,  12:38-40,  Luke 7:30,  11:15,  11:42-54,  12:1,  16:14-15,  19:45-46,  20:45-47,  John 8:44 9:30-34,  9:39-41










Notes

While much of the book of Zechariah looks forward to a time of restoration and blessing still to come to the nation of Israel, Zechariah chapter 11 describes a dark period of Jewish history that was to come before this promised time of splendid prosperity. Written approximately 500 years in advance of the events, Zechariah chapter 11 is a remarkable passage of scripture that describes Israel's rejection of their Messiah, and the subsequent judgement that befell them because of it. A prophetic parable with vivid imagery, Zechariah 11 poetically speaks of a nation brutally ruled by Gentiles, lead astray by their own leadership, and ultimately forsaken by God. Verses 1-3 paint a picture of the judgement that most Bible scholars believe occurred in 70 C.E. with the Roman conquest of Jerusalem.
1  Verses 4-14 describe the reason for the judgement, the rejection of the Messiah at the hands of the bad shepherds, Israel's leaders. The passage ends with verses 15-17, which deal with the false Messiah to come. Zechariah is instructed to play the part of a good shepherd. The acting out of a parable was not a totally uncommon method for God to communicate forthcoming events. This approach is used many times with Ezekiel, such as when God directed Ezekiel to lay on his left side and right side in a symbolic act of bearing Israel's and Judah's judgement (Ezekiel 4:4-8). So here with Zechariah, who is told to assume the role of a good shepherd. Who is this good shepherd Zechariah is representing? It is Jesus, the True Shepherd who in John 10:11 says, "I am the good shepherd: the good shepherd giveth his life for the sheep."
A Graphic View of The Judgement, Zechariah 11:1-3
"
1 OPEN thy doors, O Lebanon, that the fire may devour thy cedars 2 Howl, fir tree; for the cedar is fallen; because the mighty are spoiled: howl, O ye oaks of Bashan; for the forest of the vintage is come down. 3 There is a voice of the howling of the shepherds; for their glory is spoiled: a voice of the roaring of young lions; for the pride of Jordan is spoiled."
Verses 1-3: This is a picture of God's judgement of Israel, with an invading army that would sweep through the nation like a blazing fire, destroying everything in its path. "Lebanon" and "cedars," Solomon's temple was built with cedars from Lebanon (see Kings 5:1-11) and so the phrase "Open they doors" is thought by some to mean the temple. Others associate the cedars, towering proudly above all the rest of the trees in the forest with royalty (the house of David is likened to a lofty cedar in Ezekiel chapter 17) and the religious leadership in Israel. The cypresses in verse 2 can be connected to the common people, who cry out in fear because if the mighty cedars have fallen what hope do they have of surviving. Even the strong oaks from the fertile land of Bashan east of the Jordan river would be devastated. No one will withstand the judgement. "Lebanon," "Bashan," and "Jordan" can be understood to mean the entire land of Israel, encompassing everything from Israel's northern border (Lebanon) to its eastern side (Bashan) to its southern section (Jordan Valley).
Verses 4-6a: Even though these sheep are destined for slaughter, Zechariah, playing the role of the good shepherd is to "feed" them. The phrase "the flock of the slaughter" refers to the people of Israel. Even though Jesus knew that Israel would ultimately reject Him and fall under judgement, He fed the flock of with the good news of salvation. Just as Jeremiah was tasked to present the word of the Lord to a people who would not listen, so with Messiah. But as always, there was still a remnant who did hear and heed the word of God (see Zechariah 11:7, "The Messiah would have a ministry to the "poor," the believing remnant."). In Matthew 15:24 Jesus says, "... I am not sent but unto the lost sheep of the house of Israel." The phrase "Whose possessors slay them" in verse 5 refers to the Romans in their occupation of Israel, and their ruthless reign over the Jewish people. These possessors (or "owners") have no remorse for their actions, and feel that their success is a validation of God's blessing upon them. But even though God gave the nation of Israel into the hands of the Romans, He did not find them guiltless for their evil actions against His chosen people (Genesis 12:3) and like Babylon and the other great world powers that once ruled Israel, Rome fell.
The phrase "and their own shepherds pity them not" refers to the religious leaders, who not only had religious rule, but some civil authority as well. The Pharisees, Sadducees, and Scribes were the primary leadership to the Jewish people in Jesus' day.2  (These groups were part of the Sanhedrin, the highest court of the Jewish nation, sometimes referred to as the "council" or "rulers" in the New Testament). Unfortunately, at that time these groups had become intensely legalistic, overly focused on ritual and ceremony, rather than righteousness and truth. These self-serving, irresponsible shepherds are also described in Ezekiel chapter 34, "...Thus saith the Lord God unto the shepherds; Woe be to the shepherds of Israel that do feed themselves should not the shepherds feed the flocks?"(Ezekiel 34:2). Throughout His ministry, Jesus had constant confrontation with the religious leadership. In Matthew chapter 12 He called the Pharisees a "generation of vipers" and condemned them for their unpardonable sin of claiming His miraculous healing of a man demon possessed, blind, and dumb was from Satan when they knew it was of God. Matthew chapter 23 records Jesus' most extensive denouncement of the hypocrisy of the religious leadership. At the time when Israel should have been embracing their Messiah, their shepherds were leading them astray, and ultimately to their destruction.
1. Some try to associate Zechariah chapter 11 with the Babylonian invasion, but unless it is explained directly within the text, metaphorical language used in parables in the Hebrew Scriptures is normally used to describe a future event, and not to record what has already occurred and the specifics of which are already well known. Symbolic language is employed by God in prophecy in order to preserve the meaning its message throughout time.
Another view says the bad shepherds in Zechariah 11 are Gentile oppressors, such as the Romans. But this position is weak because verse 3 speaks of the shepherds themselves crying out as they are swept away in the judgement of Israel. In addition, the scriptures often use the figurative name of "shepherds" when describing the unprincipled and poor Jewish leaders. (See Jeremiah 50:6).
2. The Scribes are sometimes associated with the Pharisees but modern scholars believe the Scribes were not Pharisees, but non-ordained teachers of the Law who were not authorized to introduce new interpretations or rulings. Some point to this as the reason that the people were astonished (John 7:28-29, Mark 1:22) with the new concepts that Jesus delivered in His teaching, because Jesus was not a priest associated with any of the religious parties of the day.

The Messiah's brothers would disbelieve him.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Psalm 69:8b
"I am become a stranger unto my brethren, and an alien unto my mothers children."
John 7:3-5
"
3 His brethren therefore said unto him, Depart hence, and go into Judaea, that thy disciples also may see the works that thou doest. 4 For there is no man that doeth any thing in secret, and he himself seeketh to be known openly. If thou do these things, shew thyself to the world. 5 For neither did his brethren believe in him."
More Prophecies From This Book

The Messiah would be the "stone" rejected by the Jews.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Psalm 118:22
"The stone which the builders refused is become the head stone of the corner."
Matthew 21:42-43
"
42 Jesus saith unto them, Did ye never read in the scriptures, The stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the head of the corner: this is the Lords doing, and it is marvelous in our eyes? 43 Therefore say I unto you, The kingdom of God shall be taken from you, and given to a nation bringing forth the fruits thereof."
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
Mark 12:10,  Luke 20:17,  John 1:11,  Acts 4:10-12,  Ephesians 2:20,  1 Peter 2:6-8

The Jews would have a hardened heart against the Messiah.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Isaiah 6:9-10a
"
9 And he said, Go, and tell this people, Hear ye indeed, but understand not; and see ye indeed, but perceive not. 10 Make the heart of this people fat, and make their ears heavy, and shut their eyes; lest they see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and understand with their heart, and convert, and be healed."
John 12:37-40
"
37 But though he had done so many miracles before them, yet they believed not on him: ... 39 Therefore they could not believe that Esaias said again, 40 He hath blinded their eyes, and hardened their heart; that they should not see with their eyes, nor understand with their heart, and be converted, and I should heal them."
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
John 1:11,  7:16-17,  Acts 7:56-57,  Romans 1:28,  11:7-8,  Ephesians 4:18

The Messiah would be a "stumbling stone" for the Jews.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Isaiah 8:14
"And he shall be for a sanctuary; but for a stone of stumbling and for a rock of offence to both the houses of Israel, for a gin and for a snare to the inhabitants of Jerusalem."
Matthew 21:43-44
"
43 Therefore say I unto you, The kingdom of God shall be taken from you, and given to a nation bringing forth the fruits thereof. 44 And whosoever shall fall on this stone shall be broken: but on whomsoever it shall fall, it will grind him to powder."
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
Luke 20:18,  Romans 9:32-33,  1 Peter 2:7-8

The unbelief of Israel's leaders would force the Messiah to reject them.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Zechariah 11:8a
"Three shepherds also I cut off in one month; and my soul lothed them, and their soul also abhorred me."
Matthew 23:33
"Ye serpents, ye generation of vipers, how can ye escape the damnation of hell?"
Matthew 16:6
"Then Jesus said unto them, Take heed and beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees."

Mark 12:38-40
"
38 And he said unto them in his doctrine, Beware of the scribes, which love to go in long clothing, and love salutations in the market places, 39 And the chief seats in the synagogues, and the uppermost rooms at feasts: 40 Which devour widows houses, and for a pretense make long prayers: these shall receive greater damnation."
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
Matthew 3:7,  5:20,  12:22-45,  13:10-15,  15:1-9,  16:6,  23:1-39,  Mark 3:22-30,  7:5-13,  12:38-40,  Luke 11:42-54,  12:1,  16:14-15,  19:45-46,  20:45-47,  John 8:44 9:39-41










Notes

Throughout His ministry, Jesus had continual confrontation with the religous leaders of the day. As the good shepherd, Jesus fed and nurtured the flock with the words and works of God, and yet the religous leaders who in their position had more "light" given to them, and therefore more responsiblity to properly guide the people, rejected Him. John 15: 24 records Jesus saying; "If I had not done among them the works which none other man did, they had not had sin: but now have they both seen and hated both me and my Father." In Matthew chapter 23 Jesus called these bad shepherds "hypocrites," "blind guides," "fools and blind," "whited sepluchers," "serpents," and a "generation of vipers."
Not only would the religous leaders of the flock be held accountable for their actions, but also those of the flock who witnessed the wonderous works of Jesus, those who were exposed to the "true Light" of God, His grace and His truth, and yet still rejected Him (see Matthew 12:38-45). Matthew 15:14 records Jesus speaking of the religous leaders and their followers; "Let them alone: they be blind leaders of the blind. And if the blind lead the blind, both shall fall into the ditch." (Also see Matthew 23:13-15). While Jesus does not want anyone to perish, and gave His life for all, those who willfully reject God's plan of salvation will be lost.
"Three shepherds"
The meaning of "Three shepherds also I cut off in one month" has long been a source of debate and conjecture. Charles Feinberg states that at least 40 different interpretations have been offered.
1  Theories on the identity of the three shepherds range from being three world powers, to three specific individuals, to three offices. The latter seems the most likely given the context of this passage, and a widely held understanding is that the "three shepherds" refers to "three offices" (priests, prophets, and kings (or civil authorities)), or "three orders of leadership" (such as priests, elders, and scribes), both classifications being effectively embodied by groups such as the Sadducees, Pharisees, and Scribes in Jesus' day. Likewise, the meaning of "one month" has varied interpretations. Likely it refers to some period of time between the rejection of Jesus and the institution of the new dispensation. Since the rejection of Jesus and the destruction of Jerusalm in 70 C.E., Israel, in the truest sense, has been without a priest, prophet, and king. The offices of priest, prophet, and king are now realized in Jesus, the mediator of the new covenant.

1. Charles Feinberg, "The Minor Prophets" page 327

The Messiah would stop ministering to the those who rejected Him.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Zechariah 11:9
"Then said I, I will not feed you: that that dieth, let it die; and that that is to be cut off, let it be cut off; and let the rest eat every one the flesh of another."
Matthew 13:10-11
"
10 And the disciples came, and said unto him, Why speakest thou unto them in parables? 11 He answered and said unto them, Because it is given unto you to know the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven, but to them it is not given." Matthew 15:14
"Let them alone: they be blind leaders of the blind. And if the blind lead the blind, both shall fall into the ditch."
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
Matthew 12:38-39










Notes

The shepherd fed and nurtured the flock, and yet their willful rejection of what they knew was from God left Messiah no choice but to leave them in their sin.
Matthew chapter 12 outlines a key turning point in Jesus' ministry when after He healed a man demon possessed, blind, and dumb, 2  the Pharisees said "... This fellow doth not cast out devils, but by Beelzebub the prince of the devils" (Matthew 12:24). The Pharisees knew in their hearts that Jesus was from God, and yet still called the miracle which the Spirit of God had demonstraed before their very eyes an act of Satan. In Matthew 12:32 Jesus called this blasphemy by the Pharisees an unpardonable sin, "And whosoever speaketh a word against the Son of man, it shall be forgiven him: but whosoever speaketh against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this world, neither in the world to come." It should be noted that Jesus' condemnation was in reference to the people of that day ("this generation," Matthew 12:39) only. Ultimately judgement would fall upon the generation that had the very Son of God dwell among them, and yet they rejected Him and His message. In 70 C.E. the Roman army would come and devastate Jerusalem, as Jesus predicted in Luke 19:41-44. After the religous leader's deliberate rejection of what was plainly from God, Jesus spoke in parables, instructed those he healed to keep silent, and was less proactive in openly promoting his Messiahship to the masses. Jesus' speaking in parables in order to keep God's revelation from the unbelivers can ve viewed as an act of judgement, and an act of mercy. To those who had hardened their hearts with obstinate unbeleif of God's truth, His judgement was to leave them in the sinful state that they desired to be in. John 3:19 says, "And this is the condemnation, that light is come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil."If we are responsible for the light we are given, then this "blinding" (speaking in parables) of those whose would never accept God's plan salvation can be seen as an act of mercy, for otherwise their judgement would be greater.
"and let the rest eat every one the flesh of another."
Just as in the Babylonian siege of 587-586 B.C.E., when the Romans encamped around Jerusalem in 70 C.E. and cut-off supplies, some of trapped and starving people inside the city resorted to cannibalism.


1. Reference Psalm 81:11-12, "11 But my people would not hearken to my voice; and Israel would none of me. 12 So I gave them up unto their own hearts lust: and they walked in their own counsels." Also see Proverbs 1:28.
2. In his work, "Highlights from the Life of Christ," Dr. Arnold Fruchtembaum says that within the framework of Judaism it was impossible to cast out a demon from someone who was dumb - however the rabbis taught that when Messiah came, He would be able to cast out this type of demon. In Matthew chapter 12 Jesus clearly demonstrated His Messiahship by healing a man demon possessed, blind, and dumb, and yet the religous leadership was not willing to accept it.

The Messiah would be distressed over the Jews unbelief.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Isaiah 49:4a
"Then I said, I have laboured in vain, I have spent my strength for nought, and in vain: yet surely my judgment is with the Lord, and my work with my God."
Luke 19:41-42
"
41 And when he was come near, he beheld the city, and wept over it, 42 Saying, If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things which belong unto thy peace but now they are hid from thine eyes."
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
Matthew 23:37-39,  John 1:11,  5:43,  Acts 7:51

The Messiah's own people would not believe he was the Christ.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Isaiah 53:1
"WHO hath believed our report? and to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed?"
John 12:37-38
"
37 But though he had done so many miracles before them, yet they believed not on him: 38 That the saying of Esaias the prophet might be fulfilled, which he spake, Lord, who hath believed our report? and to whom hath the arm of the Lord been revealed?"
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
Matthew 13:53-58,  26:65,  Mark 14:63,  John 5:37-40,  7:47,  10:33,  Romans 10:16

The Messiah would be rejected.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Zechariah 11:12-13b
"
12 And I said unto them, If ye think good, give me my price; and if not, forbear. So they weighed for my price thirty pieces of silver. 13 And the Lord said unto me, Cast it unto the potter: a goodly price that I was prised at of them. And I took the thirty pieces of silver, and cast them to the potter in the house of the Lord."
Matthew 26:14-15
"
14 Then one of the twelve, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, 15 And said unto them, What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you? And they convenanted with him for thirty pieces of silver."
More Prophecies From This Book










Notes

Thirty pieces of silver (approximately 12 ounces) was the price one would pay in remuneration for the death of a slave (Exodus 21:32). The religous leaders valued Jesus' life as no more worthy than a common slave, clearly a expression of disdain and rejection. E.W. Hengstenberg callled the small reward of thirty peices of sliver "a figurative designation of the blackest ingratitude and the highest contempt" on the part of the Jewish leadership.
1 1. E.W. Hengstenberg, "Christology of the Old Testament"

The Messiah would be rejected.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Isaiah 53:3b
"He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were our faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not."
Matthew 27:21-23
"
20 But the chief priests and elders persuaded the multitude that they should ask Barabbas, and destroy Jesus. 21 The governor answered and said unto them, Whether of the twain will ye that I release unto you? They said, Barabbas. 22 Pilate saith unto them, What shall I do then with Jesus which is called Christ? They all say unto him, Let him be crucified. 23 And the governor said, Why, what evil hath he done? But they cried out the more, saying, Let him be crucified."
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
Mark 6:3,  15:9-15,  Luke 23:18,  John 1:11,  5:43,  7:5,  18:40,  Acts 3:14-15

The Messiah would rejected by the Jews.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Psalm 69:8a
"I am become a stranger unto my brethren, and an alien unto my mothers children."
John 1:11
"He came unto his own, and his own received him not."
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
Matthew 13:53-58,  26:65,  Mark 14:63,  John 5:37-40,  7:47,  12:37-38,  10:33,  Romans 10:21

The Messiah would be rejected by the Jews.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Isaiah 49:4b
"Then I said, I have laboured in vain, I have spent my strength for nought, and in vain: yet surely my judgment is with the Lord, and my work with my God."
John 5:43
"I am come in my Father's name, and ye receive me not..."
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
Matthew 13:53-58,  26:65,  27:21-23,  Mark 6:3,  12:10,  14:63,  15:9-15,  Luke 4:28-29,  17:25,  20:17,  23:18,  23:21,  John 1:11,  5:16,  5:37-40,  7:5,  7:47,  8:52,  10:33,  12:37-38,  15:24-25,  18:40,  19:6,  Acts 3:14-15, 4:10-12,  Romans 10:16,  10:21,  1 Peter 2:6-8










Notes

Isaiah 49:1-7
paints a picture of a dialog between Messiah and God. The scene depicted appears related to the time frame near the end of Jesus' ministry at His first coming. The disappointment expressed by Messiah in Isaiah 49:4 is in regard to His rejection by the Jewish people. While both the Jewish people and the Gentiles rejected Jesus, it is of the nation of Israel that the Messiah speaks of here. The Messiah's mission was to "restore Israel," to bring them back to God. In Matthew 15:24 Jesus says, "... I am not sent but unto the lost sheep of the house of Israel." It was Israel that was God's chosen people, and it was Israel that desperately yearned for their ultimate deliverer, the Messiah. Even though Messiah was also to be a "light to the Gentiles," it Abraham that God chose and it was though his seed that the Messiah would come so that all nations of the earth would be blessed. Israel had pre-eminance in God's plan, and in the Messiah's mission. John 1:11 records, "He came unto his own, and his own received him not." Isaiah 49:7 also speaks of Israel's rejection of Jesus. Of course not all Jewish people rejected Jesus, the disciples were Jewish, and there were some in the religious leadership (such as Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathaea) that embraced Him, but the Jewish nation overall did not.

The Messiah would be rejected in favor of another king.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Zechariah 11:4-6c
"
4 Thus saith the Lord my God; Feed the flock of the slaughter; 5 Whose possessors slay them, and hold themselves not guilty: and they that sell them say, Blessed be the Lord; for I am rich: and their own shepherds pity them not. 6 For I will no more pity the inhabitants of the land, saith the Lord: but, lo, I will deliver the men every one into his neighbours hand, and into the hand of his king: and they shall smite the land, and out of their hand I will not deliver them."
John 19:13-15
"
13 When Pilate therefore heard that saying, he brought Jesus forth and sat down in the judgment seat in a place that is called the Pavement, but in the Hebrew, Gabbatha. 14 And it was the preparation of the passover, and about the sixth hour: and he saith unto the Jews, Behold your King. 15 But they cried out, Away with him, away with him, crucify him. Pilate saith unto them, Shall I crucify your King? The chief priests answered, We have no king but Caesar."
More Prophecies From This Book










Notes

The words "...into the hand of his king" in Zechariah 11:6 points to the Jewish people rejecting their true King, Jesus in favor of a false king (Caesar) who would ultimately lead them into destruction. John 19:15 records the response of the people (being greatly influenced by their religious leaders, see Mark 15:11) when Pilate presented Jesus to them as their king, "... We have no king but Caesar."
It's ironic that the Roman conquest (and the removal of the religious leaders' position of authority) that the Pharisees, Saducesees, and Scribes sought to avoid by rejecting Jesus as Messiah should come upon them anyway. After Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead, the leaders still refused to acknowledge that He was Messiah, and plotted to kill Him. John 11:47-50 captures their dialog, " 47 Then gathered the chief priests and the Pharisees a council, and said, What do we? for this man doeth many miracles. 48 If we let him thus alone, all men will believe on him: and the Romans shall come and take away both our place and nation. 49 And one of them, named Caiaphas, being the high priest that same year, said unto them, 50 Ye know nothing at all. Nor consider that it is expedient for us, that one man should die for the people, and that the whole nation perish not." John goes on to say that Caiaphas did not realize the profoundly prophetic nature of his remarks, that yes, one man was in fact going to die in place of the whole nation, this being God's sovereign will and plan of salvation for all mankind.

The Messiah would be rejected.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Zechariah 11:12-13b
"
12 And I said unto them, If ye think good, give me my price; and if not, forbear. So they weighed for my price thirty pieces of silver. 13 And the Lord said unto me, Cast it unto the potter: a goodly price that I was prised at of them. And I took the thirty pieces of silver, and cast them to the potter in the house of the Lord."
Matthew 26:14-15
"
14 Then one of the twelve, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, 15 And said unto them, What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you? And they convenanted with him for thirty pieces of silver."
More Prophecies From This Book










Notes

Thirty pieces of silver (approximately 12 ounces) was the price one would pay in remuneration for the death of a slave (Exodus 21:32). The religous leaders valued Jesus' life as no more worthy than a common slave, clearly a expression of disdain and rejection. E.W. Hengstenberg callled the small reward of thirty peices of sliver "a figurative designation of the blackest ingratitude and the highest contempt" on the part of the Jewish leadership.
1 1. E.W. Hengstenberg, "Christology of the Old Testament"

The Messiah would be rejected by Gentiles.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Psalm 2:1
"WHY do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing?"
Acts 4:25-28
"
25 Who by the mouth of thy servant David hast said, Why did the heathen rage, and the people imagine vain things? 26 The kings of the earth stood up, and the rulers were gathered together against the Lord, and against his Christ. 27 For of a truth against thy holy child Jesus, whom thou hast anointed, both Herod, and Pontius Pilate, with the Gentiles, and the people of Israel, were gathered together, 28 For to do whatsoever thy hand and thy counsel determined before to be done."
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
Luke 17:25

The Messiah would be rejected.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Zechariah 12:10c
"And I will pour upon the house of David, and upon the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the spirit of grace and of supplications: and they shall look upon me whom they have pierced, and they shall mourn for him, as one mourneth for his only son, and shall be in bitterness for him, as one that is in bitterness for his firstborn."
John 1:11
"He came unto his own, and his own received him not."
John 5:40
"And ye will not come to me, that ye might have life."
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
Matthew 13:53-58,  26:65,  27:21-23,  Mark 6:3,  12:10,  14:63,  15:9-15,  Luke 4:28-29,  17:25,  20:17,  23:18,  23:21,  John 1:11,  5:16,  5:37-40,  7:5,  7:47,  8:52,  10:33,  12:37-38,  15:24-25,  18:40,  19:6,  Acts 3:14-15, 4:10-12,  Romans 10:16,  10:21,  1 Peter 2:6-8










Notes

While Luke 23:48  records the mourning of the people immediately after the crucifixion of Jesus, Zechariah 12:10 looks forward in time to His second coming. The intense grief being displayed by the Jewish people in this future event is over the fact that collectively, the nation Israel had rejected and crucified Jesus at His first coming. The pouring out of the Holy Spirit will soften the hearts that were once so hardened. "We see the Lord pierced, and then the piercing of our own heart begins. When the Lord reveals Jesus to us, we begin to have our sins revealed. We see who it was that was pierced, and this deeply stirs our sorrow."
1 This verse is one of the sections of scripture that caused the ancient rabbis to believe that there would be two Messiahs, one "Messiah ben Joseph" who would suffer and be killed, and the other "Messiah ben David," who would be a victorious kingly Messiah. But God had a different plan in mind, instead of two Messiahs, there would be one Messiah that came twice.

1. C.H. Spurgeon, "Christ in The Old Testament"

The Messiah's rejection would cause God to remove His protection of Israel.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Zechariah 11:4-6b
"
4 Thus saith the Lord my God; Feed the flock of the slaughter; 5 Whose possessors slay them, and hold themselves not guilty: and they that sell them say, Blessed be the Lord; for I am rich: and their own shepherds pity them not. 6 For I will no more pity the inhabitants of the land, saith the Lord: but, lo, I will deliver the men every one into his neighbours hand, and into the hand of his king: and they shall smite the land, and out of their hand I will not deliver them."
Luke 19:41-44
"
41 And when he was come near, he beheld the city, and wept over it, 42 Saying, If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things which belong unto thy peace but now they are hid from thine eyes. 43 For the days shall come upon thee, that thine enemies shall cast a trench about thee, and compass thee round, and keep thee in on every side, 44 And shall lay thee even with the ground, and thy children within thee; and they shall not leave in thee one stone upon another; because thou knewest not the time of thy visitation."
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
Matthew 24:1-2,  Mark 13:1-2,  Luke 21:5-6,  21:24










Notes

Abused by Gentile possessors, abandoned by their own shepherds, and yet the worst is to come as verse 6 says the Lord will no longer "pity" (to spare from judgement) the people of Israel.
1  God is long-suffering, but he is also Holy and righteous and at some point He must judge sin. The phrase "I will deliver the men every one into his neighbour's hand" speaks of the internal strife that would befall the Jewish people as history records the bitter fighting amongst themselves after the rejection of Jesus and before the Roman destruction of Jerusalem. Luke 19:41-44 records Jesus' anguised prediction of the coming devastation that occured in 70 C.E. when the Roman army laid siege to Jerusalem. When the city was crowded with people having come from all over Israel to observe Passover, the Roman General Titus surrounded it, cutting off all food and supplies and systemactically conqurered Jerusalem over a period of five months. The temple was completely destroyed and over 1 million Jewish people were killed in the war. 1. When dealing with the subject of judgement, the Hebrew scriptures frequenty associtates not having "pity" with not "sparing" as in not sparing from some type of punishment or suffering (see Deuteronomy 13:8-9, Isaiah 13:18, Jeremiah 13:14, Ezezkiel 7:4)

The Messiah's rejection would cause God to remove His protection of Israel.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Zechariah 11:10-11a
"
10 And I took my staff, even Beauty, and cut it asunder, that I might break my covenant which I had made with all the people. 11 And it was broken in that day: and so the poor of the flock that waited upon me knew that it was the word of the Lord."
Luke 19:41-44
"
41 And when he was come near, he beheld the city, and wept over it, 42 Saying, If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things which belong unto thy peace but now they are hid from thine eyes. 43 For the days shall come upon thee, that thine enemies shall cast a trench about thee, and compass thee round, and keep thee in on every side, 44 And shall lay thee even with the ground, and thy children within thee; and they shall not leave in thee one stone upon another; because thou knewest not the time of thy visitation."
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
Matthew 24:1-2,  Mark 13:1-2,  Luke 21:5-6,  21:24










Notes

The word "people" in Zechariah 11:10 comes from the Hebrew "am" which has a root meaning of "a unit," or "a tribe."
1  Most interpret this to mean Israel, the elect people. This verse points to removal of God's protection of Israel because they did not receive the "good shepherd," Jesus. Jerusalem and the temple were destroyed by the Roman general Titus in 70 C.E., approximately forty years after Jesus was crucified. Jesus foretold of the destruction of the temple as recorded in Matthew 24:1-2. Over one million Jewish people were killed during the 70 C.E. invasion of Jerusalem. Ultimately, Israel will accept their rejected Messiah (see Zechariah 12:10 and Zechariah 13:6) and God will fulfill his promise to Abraham (see Genesis 12:2-3). "... the poor of the flock that waited upon me knew that it was the word of the Lord."
John 10:27
says, "My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me." The "poor of the flock" were the faithful remnant of Jewish people that believed that Jesus was Messiah. Commentators note that between 66 C.E. and 68 C.E, when the Romans had come upon Jerusalem but had not yet destroyed it, there was an exodus of believers from the city to the mountain area of Pella, in southern Jordan. These people understood Jesus' words that Israel would be judged for their rejection of Him, and avoided the onslaught of the Romans. Their flight to the mountain area of Pella may have been in response to Jesus' statement in Luke 21:20-21, " 20 And when ye shall see Jerusalem compassed with armies, then know that the desolation thereof is nigh. 21 Then let them which are in Judaea flee to the mountains; and let them which are in the midst of it depart out; and let not them that are in the countries enter thereinto." While Jesus' statements in Luke 21:20-21 speak of a tribulation still to come, the people of that time had good reason to apply His words to their circumstance, and their escape to the mountains was a model of events to be fulfilled in the future "day of the Lord."

1. Because the word for "people" is plural in the Hebrew, the covenant of protection is understood by some to be one that God made with the Gentile nations (peoples) on behalf of Israel.

Israel would be scattered as a result of rejecting the Messiah.
Prophecy Fulfillment
Zechariah 13:7d
"Awake, O sword, against my shepherd, and against the man that is my fellow, saith the Lord of hosts: smite the shepherd, and the sheep shall be scattered: and I will turn mine hand upon the little ones."
Matthew 26:31-56
"
31 Then saith Jesus unto them, All ye shall be offended because of me this night: for it is written, I will smite the shepherd, and the sheep of the flock shall be scattered abroad. ... 56 Then all the disciples forsook him, and fled."
More Prophecies From This Book Additional Fulfillment Examples
Mark 14:27,  14:50,  John 16:32










Notes

"Smite the shepherd, and the sheep shall be scattered"
A flock without a shepherd will scatter. Because the Jewish people rejected Jesus, the Good Shepherd, they would be shepherdess - being exposed to danger, and would lose their way. Jesus quotes Zechariah 13:7 to the disciples in Matthew 26:31 shortly before they fled after He was apprehended by the Roman soldiers. The statement Jesus made to the disciples can be seen as either an application of the scripture to the situation - the disciples would be "scattered," confused and afraid after their shepherd was taken to be smitten, or it can be viewed as the initiation of a progressive fulfillment that would be fully realized in 70 C.E., at the destruction of Jerusalem and the great dispersion of the Jewish people. In either event, the ultimate fulfillment of the scattering depicted in Zechariah 13:7 is the dispersion of the Jewish people that occurred in 70 C.E. at the fall of Jerusalem at the hands of the Romans.
It's interesting to note that Jesus said the that the flock would be "scattered abroad," speaking of the Jewish migration to countries throughout the world. The scattering or dispersion spoken of in Zechariah 13:7 is directly associated with the rejection of the Good Shepherd in Zechariah chapter 11, and specifically with the judgement of the breaking of the brotherhood between Judah and Israel in Zechariah 11:14.
"and I will turn mine hand upon the little ones."
There are several interpretations of the phrase "and I will turn mine hand upon the little ones" spoken by God in Zechariah 13:7. Some understand it to mean that the judgement to occur would be universal among the Jewish people, even the "little ones," the innocent people and their families would suffer because of the rejection of the Messiah caused by the religious leadership of Israel. Others see it just the opposite, that the "little ones" are the same as "the poor of the flock," the believing remnant of the Jewish people that understood that Jesus was Messiah. The phrase "turn mine hand upon" is interpreted as God's protection of the faithful (instead of the rendering "turn my hand against" signifying judgement).

Fulfillment:
First Century Jewish
Expectations of Messiah







I.Major Messianic Expectations


The general "qualifications" for Messiah were: decendant of Jesse, of David, through the line to Solomon, thorugh the kings of Judah and finally through Zerubbabel. This means of course that he would come from the tirbe of Judah. They expected him to free them from the Romans and bring in a great time of world peace and a holy nation. But they also had many other expectations which are in differing degrees, not necessarily those recognized by Jews today. Edersheim reveals most of these and they will be demonstrated within the context of arguments below. IT is not clear exactly how common or universal all of these expectations were, but they did exist and some were common within first century Judaism. Since it is absurd to think that Jews would just give up their faith and dash off to join another religion, we should expect that all of the claims Jesus made and that are made about him by his early followers were present in Jewish expectation, and so we do.



What we find when we examine these, and others below, is not a host of randum fulfillments but that
they tell the whole Jesus story as presented in the Gospels. Suffering, rejection, dissaperance, death, return. These expectations will be demonstrated in the course of the following arguments.

Overview

(1) Linage: Tribe of Judah, decent through David.

(2) Decent through line of Zerubabel.

(3) associated with Galilee

(4) Star will Herald Birth

(5) Mystery concerning his seed

(6) Son of God

(7) Unrecognized by his people

(8) Rejected by his people--impresioned

(9) He would be the Suffereing Servant of Is 53

(a) wounded for the people's transgressions

(b) wounded (preiced)

(c) flogged--stripes form beating

(d) cut off from land of living

(e) See the light of life


A.Expectations.

(1) Linage: Tribe of Judah, decent through David.


The whole of chapter 11 (Isaiah) is designated by more than one ancient rabbinical source as pertaining to the Messiah.Targum v 1-6 as Messianic.(Jer. Berach 5a and Snah 93b) and number of passages in the Midrashim . v 1 says "a shoot will come up from the stump of Jesse." Jesus was decended from Jesse, father of King David.


Edersheim demonstrates thorugh many many passages of Rabbinical origin that "branch" and "branch of David" are terms specifically designating the Messiah, but Eisenman and Wise also document this fact specificially using the whole phrase "Branch of David." (24). Of course this phrase is used often in describing Jesus, and in fact is a pun on the word "Nazerath" since no prophesy of the OT predicts the Messiah coming form Nazerath.


Eisenman and Wises translation of "Genesis Florolegium" coloum 5.1 "The Government shall not pass from the tribe of Judah. During Isreal's dominian a Davic decendant on the Throne shall not cease...[elipseies mine] until the Branch of David comes because to him and to his seed was given the covenant of the Kingdom of his people in perpetuiy.." (89).(4q252)



(2) Decent through line of Zerubabel.


Haggi 2:23, after describing how their supplies and harvest yeilds were low the Lord would take them back and an abundant harvest will come. He makes an apocylpitic statemtn about nations being saken and armies being defeated and then prounces that Z is his choice and he will "use you like a signant ring" Why does the book end with this statement, after building up to it through description of Messianich times and forgiveness for Israel. Zerubbabel becomes the final focual point. He is the line of the Messiah.


Zechariah 4:7 "What are you O mighty Mountain before Zerubbabel you will become level ground, then he will bring out the capstone..." IT goes on to say Z will lay the foundation for the temple. That really happened. So that's not so amazing, but it is linked to Messianic prophesy as the language of the captone is seen by Rabbis Quoted by Edersheim as a reference to Messiah, and in Gospels of course that is what is meant when Jesus speaks of Himself as "the stone that the builders rejected."


In 3:8 God tells Joshua the priest that he will bring a branch. In the Notes to the Oxford Bible (RSV), of Messianic prophesy, it says "8 Branch a Davidic figure who is to usher in the Messianic age (compare Psalm 132:17...) here refurs to Zerubbabel (see 6:9-15n) Now that note says "This section abounds with difficulties. ORiginally it probablly directed crowning of Zerubbabel as Messianich King but was revised to refur to Joshua."


Zech. 3:8 "The designation 'Branch' is expressly applied to King MEssiah in the Targum. Indeep this is one of the Messiah's peculiar names." Thus these branch references link Z to Messiah in some fundamental way.


Now look again at 4:7 where it speaks of Z and the Capstone. Zech 4:7 is generally applied to the Messiah, expressly in the Targum and also in several of the Midrashim, thus as reguards both clauses of it Tanchuma (Par. Toledoth 14 ed. Warsh p. 56 at the top.) --Edersheim, 735).


So Z is clearly linked to Messiah. And as he lays the corner stone, which, though it was litterally something he did do in history, can also have a double meaning, especially since that very verse is linked Messianichally. So the Messiah comes through Z's line, which links Jesus closer and removes the curse a priori.


(3) Associated with Galilee


From
Isaiah 9:1-3 "In the future he will honor Galilee of the gentiles, by the way of the Sea...The people who walked in Darkenss have seen a great light..." This whole chapter showed to be Messianich by Edersheim and leads into the declaration of Messiah's divinity (see below).



Allegro documents Isaiah suffering servant Messianic.
[John Allegro, The Dead Sea scrolls, Pelican, 1956] Allegro was the only member of the original translation team who was neither Christain nor Jew, but claimed "nutrality." However, he was criticized by other members of the team as being anti-Chrsitian and skeptical]

"In one of their hyms the sect pictures itself as a pregant woman suffering the pangs of parturition as she gives birth to her 'firstborn' who is described in terms reminiscent of the Child of Isaish 9:6, the 'Wonderful Counsellor.' Most scholars agree that the passage retains its biblical Messianic significance, in which case it appears that the Sect believed that out of its suffering of atonement for 'the land' would come the Anointed One or Christ."(161).


Is. 8:14 is applied to Messianic times by the
Talmud(sanh 38a) and of 9:6 Edersheim says "is expressly applied to the Messiah in the Targum also Haggada in Debarim and Bemidbar." (Edersheim, 723).


(4) Star will Herald Birth


"There is however testimony which seems to us not only reliable, but embodies most ancient Jewish tradition. It is contianed in one of the smaller Midrashim of which a collection has lattley been published. ...the so called Messiah Haggadda...'a star shall come out of Jacob' ...'the star shall shine out of the East and this is the Star of the Messiah.'" (Dr. Jellineck a work in six part Beth ha Midrash LIep and Venne 1853--in
Edersheim 211-212). Edershiem also quotes three other midrashim. These are presented in the same book. Edershiem goes on to document (Ibid) from the works of Keppler that a conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn did actually occurr two years before the birth of Chrsit, and the following year was joined by Mars making for an extremely bright sideriol event.

There is also the star prophecy from Numbers refurring to a star out of Jacob and linked to the world ruler at Qumran (see above reference).
Eisenman and Wise document many times the importance of this prophecy at Qumran, int he revolt of 66 and the bar Kochba revolt of 135 (and indeed the name bar Kochba itself which means son of the star). Perhaps it could be that, though the star in Numbers is the Messiah himself, the notion of a Star as a herold and symbol of the birth of the 'ture Star' somehow was prophecied in an oral tradition, or at least traspossed. This thought must have crossed Edersheim's mind for he does mention the numbers prophecy here in passing.


(5) Mystery concerning his seed (Virgin Birth?)


Edersheim states:
"It is is not without hesitation that we make reference to the Jewish allusions to the miraculous birth of the Savior. Yet there are two expressions which convey the idea of, if not super human origin, yet of some great mystery attaching to his birth. The first occurrs in connection with the birth of Seth R. Tanocum said in the name of R. Samuel "Eve had respect [regard, looing to] the seed which is to come 'form another place' and who is this? This is King Messiah [Ber R. 23 ed. Warsh] The second appears in the narrative of the Crime of Lot's daughters 'it is not written that we may preserve a seed from our father," but 'seed form our father.' This is that seed which is coming form another place. And who is this? This is Messiah the king.'" (Edersheim p178, in Ber R. 51= Bereshith Rabba on Genesis).


I have looked over the Thanksgiving Hymn in question from the DSS (1QH 11:3-12) and can make a few comments. 1. It speaks of original sin. Yes. Original sin is not a doctrine that got thought up by Christian theologians. It is a doctrine of the Essenes, and thus Jewish in origin. The piece in question refers to children being born from "the breakers of sin," and that the these "breakers of the pit" (as they are also called) cause all acts and deeds of terror and sin. 2. It passingly speaks of the Messiah. It refers to a child born who will be "wonderful counselor" (Isaiah 9). 3. The Messiah is free from Original Sin. "There emerges from the crucible of the pregnant woman a wonderful counselor with all his strength, and the boy is freed from the breakers." The breakers being a ref to original sin, being free of the breakers would mean being free of original sin. My understanding at this point is that the man child is the "seed of the woman" referred to in Genesis 3. He is contrasted in line 12 with the seed of the serpent. According to the guy who pointed me to this hymn, a prof who did his PhD on the use of Abba in the DSS, this is far from the only reference to original sin in the DSS.


Frank


(written and sent to me by a friend named "Frank" who posts on Apolgetics.org)


(6)Messiah would be Divine


Neverhteless we find in the Dead Sea Scrolls "Sons of Light" already understood the Messiah as the Son of God before Jesus came onto the scene. "He will be called Son of God and they will call him son of the Most High.... His Kingdom will be an eternal kingdom and all his paths in truth and uprightness. The earth will be in truth and will make peace. The Sword will cease in the earth and all the cities will pay him homage."
(F.G.Martinez: Dead Sea Scrolls Translated, 2nd ed. (New York:E.J. Brill Leiden)1992). The concept of Son of God existed at Qumran before Christianity, and thus was in Judaism, and was not made up by Jesus' followers.


Isaiah 9:1-3
quoted as Messianic in Edersheim's list and at Qumran, the Messiah to come from Seed of Jessy, from Galilee. "The people who walk in Darkness have seen a great light." Light related to Messiah (see above). This verse in particular is Mesianic at Qumran and on list. v6 "to us a child is born, to us a son is given, the government will be on his shoulders and he will be called 'wonderful conselor'Almighty God, Everlasting Father Prience of Peace." "Prince of David" was a Messianic title at Qumran. "Of the increase of his government and peace there will be no end...with justice and righteousness from that time on and forever."

Now Rabbinical apologists today say that this merely refurs to the child born in capter 7 as a sign to the King that God will support them in battle. This is a verse often quoted by Chrsitians becasue it sepaks of a "Virigin Birth." Most Chrsitians take this as the expectation of the Messiah as born of a virgin, as was Jesus. Yet Modern day Jewish apologists disagree. They say that the child was not born of a vigin, but that the word is mistanslated in chp 7. But the passage in nine indicates that, while the interpritation fits with the ostincible story of the chapter, the birth of Mahar-Shalal-Hash-Baz" (the child), the passage in verse nine has doule meaning. For not only does it fit with the sotry in Isaiah, but it was also understood by Rabbis of Jesus' day to harold the Messiah. This can only be the case unless Mahar-Shala-Hash-Baz was to be called "every lasting father, almighty God."


"Isaiah 9:6 is expressly applied to Messiah in Targum"
Debarim R1 (ed. Wash p4) The Child referred to in Chp. 9 is the Messiah, HE will be called "everlasting father, almighty God," Which the Jewish expositors would not call the Messiah, but Jesus Christ has been so called! As further proof that this passage is Messianic Edersheim also shows that the next verse, 7, "the government shall be on his shoulders," is attentested by Rabbinical authorities as Messianic. Whose shoulders shall the government be on? The child in v6, the "almighty God."

It is argued by the Jewish apologists of today that nowhere do the scritpures speak of a man being sacraficed for the sins of the people; nor does it speak of a resurrection of the Messiah form the dead. It is not very likely hat any Jews of Jesus' day understood what was about to befall him. But it is not true that the scriptures don't teach these things. When the first followers of Jesus turned to the Scriptueres to try and understand what had happaned they saw in them the cruciffiction and the Ressurection. They understood this as a fulfillment of Messianic prophesy, though understood expost facto. While this leaves us open to the charge of reading in a meaning that is not there, it can be argued that it is a sound interpriation of scripture.



(7) Unrecognized by his people


Is. 8:14
"...he will be a sancuary but to both houses of Israel he will be a stone that causes men to stumble and a rock that makes them fall and to the people of Jerusalem he will be a snare" [not the application to Christ, the evengelists even refurr to the stumbling stone in the Gosple's] it makes perfect sense within the context of the story in Is. and no one would think it refurrs to something else, and yet the rabbinate says it does. This is more evidence of intersperssed Messianich prophecy; or "double meaning." It makes sense on one level and then is interpreted on another. Is. 10:27 says: "in that day their burden will be lifted from their shoulders; their yoke from their neck." Again, Edersheim quotes rabbinical sources which show that these verses speak of the Messiah.


(8) Rejected by the masses and Imprisioned


"Jewish writtings speak frequenly of the so called sorrows of the Messiah (Chebhley shel Mashiech ) [Sabb.118]. These were partly those of the Messiah and partly those coming on Israel and the word previous to coming of the Messiah...peroid of internal corrupton..."
Edersheim 433. Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedrin 98bThe Rabbis said: His name is "the leper scholar," as it is written, Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him a leper, smitten of God, and afflicted. [Isaiah 53:4].

Ruth Rabbah 5:6The fifth interpretation [of Ruth 2:14] makes it refer to the Messiah. Come hither: approach to royal state. And eat of the BREAD refers to the bread of royalty; AND DIP THY MORSEL IN THE VINEGAR refers to his sufferings, as it is said, But he was wounded because of our transgressions.


(Isa. LIII, 5).-- Soncino Midrash Rabbah (vol. 8, p. 64).


The Karaite Yefeth ben Ali (10th c.)As to myself, I am inclined, with Benjamin of Nehawend, to regard it as alluding to the Messiah, and as opening with a description of his condition in exile, from the time of his birth to his accession to the throne: for the prophet begins by speaking of his being seated in a position of great honour, and then goes back to relate all that will happen to him during the captivity. He thus gives us to understand two things: In the first instance, that the Messiah will only reach his highest degree of honour after long and severe trials; and secondly, that these trials will be sent upon him as a kind of sign, so that, if he finds himself under the yoke of misfortunes whilst remaining pure in his actions, he may know that he is the desired one....


(9) He would be the Suffereing Servant of Is 53


(a) wounded for the people's transgressions

We need not expect that the corropsondence between the sin offering of the temple and the crucifiction be one to one. In other words, the tempel offering was to be without blimish, Christ was sinless, but why must he also corrospond one to one with all the requirements? If so, he would have to be less than a year old. Jewish Apologists often quote injunctions from the Deuteronimical code against human sacrafice and argue that to sacrafice a man for the sins of the people violates the law of Moses.Obviously this doesn't apply in the cas of the Messiah, because he was the perfect offering and because it was God's will and God himself as the offering.


That being said the OT clearly teaches that the Messiah will take upon himself the sins of the people.


"Surely he took up our infirmaties and carried our sorrows and yet we considered him stricken by God, smitten by him and afflicted, but he was periced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities, the punishment that brought us peace was upon him and by his wounds we are healed...the Lord has laid upon him the iniquity of us all, the was oppressed and afflicted, yet he did not open his mouth, he was like a lamb to the salughter...for the transgression of my people he was stricken..."



(727) Also see below on suffering servant where this same passage interpreted as bearing the sins of the people in suffering). v"yet it was the Lord's will to crush him and cause him to suffer...the Lord make shis life to be a guilt offering..."


This remarkable passage clearly teaches that the Messiah would take upon himself the sins of the people, that he would be stricken for them. Moreover the Jews of Jesus day did expect that, though they did not necessarily think of it as curcifiction, they did expect that the messiah would be striken for them in his sufferings, which has already been point out. Edersheim shows that Rabbinical authorities views these passages as applicable to the Messiah.


-- S. R. Driver and A. Neubauer, editors, The Fifty-third Chapter of Isaiah According to the Jewish Interpreters (2 volumes; New York: Ktav, 1969), pp. 19-20. The English translations used here are taken from volume 2. The original texts are in volume 1. Cf. Soloff, pp. 107-09. Another statement from Yefeth ben Ali:By the words "surely he hath carried our sicknesses," they mean that the pains and sickness which he fell into were merited by them, but that he bore them instead. . . . And here I think it necessary to pause for a few moments, in order to explain why God caused these sicknesses to attach themselves to the Messiah for the sake of Israel. . . . The nation deserved from God greater punishment than that which actually came upon them, but not being strong enough to bear it. . . God appoints his servant to carry their sins, and by doing so lighten their punishment in order that Israel might not be completely exterminated."-- Driver and Neubauer, pp. 23 ff.; Soloff pp. 108-109.


Another statement from Yefeth ben Ali"And the Lord laid on him the iniquity of us all." The prophet does not by avon mean iniquity, but punishment for iniquity, as in the passage, "Be sure your sin will find you out" (Num. xxxii. 23).-- Driver and Neubauer, p. 26; Soloff p. 109.


In his list of Messianich passages, drawn from the most ancient sources, Yalkut, Targrum, Talmuds, Midrashim, Edersheim deomonstates all the passages of the suffering servant are Missianic. "how beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of those that bring good news," Messianic. v 13 of Is. 53 the
Targum applies to Messiah. "and he was wounded for our transgressions, and bruised for our iniquities, and the chastisement of our peace was upon Him, and whith His stripes we are healed."is Messianich, R Huna says in the name of R Acha "all sufferings are divided into three parts, one part goes to David and the patriarchs, another to the generation of the rebellion and third to King Messiah, as it is written (ps 2:7) 'yet have I set my Kind upon my holy hill of Zion.'" Edersheim adds a quotation from the Midrash on Samuel, in which theMessiah indicates that his "dwelling is on Mount Zion and that guilt is connected to the destruction of it's walls."

(b) wounded (pierced)

Overview of veres:

*Isaiah 53:5
*Crucifiction in Psalm 22: 1,7,14-18
*Zechariah 12:10 "They will look upon me, the one they preiced."


evidence on verses:



Is 53


Ps 22


v1 "My God, my God, why have you forsken me?" Jesus last words on the corss. v7 "all who see me mock me, they hural insults..." v14 "I am poured out like water and all my bones are out of joint/my heart has turned to wax/...my touge sticks to the roof of my mouth..." v"they have peirced my hands and my feet ...they divide my garements among them." This is a picture of Chist on the corss. The mocking of the crowd, the physical effects of being crucified upon the heart and internal organs, and the peicing of hands and feet, and the acts of the soldiers at the cross. Of course one can argue that gambling for his clothing is a detail added latter to the Gospel account for veri simelitude, but what are the chances of the effects of crucifiction, a means of exicution totally unknown in Isaiah's time?


The Jewish apologists argue that the verse is wrongly rendered. They say it sepaks of animals tearing at the persona, and that the line about peircing hands and feet should really read "like lions my hands and feet," or "lions tear at my hands and feet." This is arguable if one only goes by the Hebrew text. But in the Septuagent (LXX) the Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures made in Alexandria before the time of Christ, and used as the Bible of the early chruch, it says "peirced." Moreover, they cannot dispute the physical discription of crucifiction, its effects upon the heart and internal organs, nor the statment of bones being out of joint, through the beatting prioir to the resurrection, and the breaking of legs to hasten death.


Of Pslam 22
Yalkut views as Messianic and relates it to Is. 9. Edersheim writes "using almost the same words of the Evangelists to describe the crowd's mocking behavior at the cross." The verse says "all who see me mock me, they hurl insults shaking their heads." He also shows Yalkutlinks v.15 to the Messiah, and this is the exact verse put forword as a discription of crucifiction! "my strenth is dried up as a potshred my tounge sticks to the roof of my mouth; you lay me in the dust of death."


Zechariah 12:10


New American Standard Bible (©1995) "I will pour out on the house of David and on the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the Spirit of grace and of supplication, so that they will look on Me whom they have pierced; and they will mourn for Him, as one mourns for an only son, and they will weep bitterly over Him like the bitter weeping over a firstborn.


the hebrew used here for "pierced" is dqar, meaning to bore or dig or pierce. It clearly means pierced. Pherhaps it could be translated another way, this pierced is clear

(c) flogged--stripes form beating

Is 53
"by his srtipes we are heald"
(d) cut off from land of living

Is 53:10

(e) See the light of life

The resurrection is clearly seen in the account of the "suffering servant" from Isaiah 53:8
"...he was cut off from the land of the living, for the transgression of my people he was stricken, he was assigned a grave with the wicked..." One thinks of the two theives on the their corsses crucified on either side of Christ. But in v 11 "after the suffering of his soul, he will see the light of life and be satisfied. By his knolwdge my rightous servant will jutify many and he will bear their iniquities...for he bore the sin of many and made intercession for the transgressors.."


B.Fulfillment in Jesus


There are some telling differences between the Mesoretic and the LXX and again the LXX agrees with the DSS on these points. MT does not have "light of life" on v11 but DSS and LXX do. And also on v11 rather than his knowlege "knowlege of him. (from Margin notes in New International Version).




This list of expectations outlines the story of Jesus' life as recorded in the gospels: His brith, his family, the claims to his divine nature, his mission.Jesus meets everyone of these requirements, most of them, like his family and the star at this birth would have been beyond his control:



(1) Decendent of David
(Matt 1:1-22) (Luke 3) (Rom 1:3)
(2)From line of Zerubabel
(Mat 1:12 "And after they were brought to Babylon, Jechonias begat Salathiel; and Salathiel begat Zorobabel...")

(3)Born in Galilee
(in Nazerath)
(4)Mystery--calims of virgin birth

(5)Star hearlds brith
--Keppler proved conjunction of planets in 4BC
(6)Son of God--claimed to be

(7)Not accepted by masses

(8)Rejected by the masses:
by crowd in favor of Bar Abas
(9)Manner of his death and mission
--curcified for sins of world and rose from dead.

II.Why the Suffering Servant cannot be Israel as a nation.

The Jewish apologists cliam that this passage in Isaiah (53) speaks of Israel rather than of the Messiah. They argue that all the references to the servant are in the plural rather than the singular. But this is not the case in the LXX or DSS. Those references are singular. Furthermore, to read the passage as the nation of Israel would necessitate the absurdity of the nation of Israel taking upon itself its own sins in order to be a guilt offering for itself. Let's read it that way:


Surely [they] took up their infirmaties and carried [their] sorrows and yet [they] considered [themselves] stricken by God, smitten by him and afflicted, but [they] were periced for [their own] transgressions, [they] [were] crushed for [their own] iniquities, the punishment that brought [themselves] peace was upon [they themselves] and by [their own] wounds [they heal themselves]...the Lord has laid upon [them] the iniquity of [them] all, [they were] oppressed and afflicted, yet [they] did not open [their] mouth[s], [they] [were] like a lamb to the salughter...for the transgression of my people [my people were stricken]


In that sense it looses all meaning. What would be the point? Espeically in the line
"the punishment that brought them peace was upon them." What sense does that make? It totally looses the meaning of soemone who was thought to be unworthy who suffers on behalf of the people, and makes the people themselves their own guilt offering. Moreover, the Jews have never been totally cut off from the land of the living. I also challenge anyone to find a Rabbi with that reading from before let's say the begiing of the third century. The actual verse does not have the plural but the singular! "Surely He took upon himself their infimaties and carried our sorrows and yet we considered him stricken by God, smitten by him and affliicted, byt he was periced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities..."



R. Elijah de Vidas (16th c.)Since the Messiah bears our iniquities which produce the effect of His being bruised, it follows that whoso will not admit that the Messiah thus suffers for our iniquities, must endure and suffer for them himself.-- Driver and Neubauer, p. 331.


Rabbi Moshe Alshekh (El-Sheikh) of Sefad (16th c.)I may remark, then, that our Rabbis with one voice accept and affirm the opinion that the prophet is speaking of the King Messiah, and we ourselves also adhere to the same view.-- Driver and Neubauer, p. 258.

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